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Suzanne opens this episode with some brief gushing over

Chris Hemsworth in Ron Howard’s Rush, a film she and Bob

both recommend this year along with Dallas Buyers Club.

 

After mentioning the ongoing Hollywood-Santa Barbara

connection—with a nod to the Santa Barbara International Film

Festival soon coming to their neighborhood—Bob admits that he

 may not have been the “perfect fit” as writer-producer

on Star Trek: The Next Generation.

 

Bob confesses his frustration with the “downward spiral of politics”

among the show’s executives and producers, and reveals

his ironic point of view about writing for one of

television’s cultural holy grails. 

 

With a focus on the show’s characters and storylines,

Bob’s year as a writer-producer was colored by

his irreverent take on all things technical...to the point that

he wrote Samaritan Snare, an episode featuring an alien culture

that was the antithesis of The Star Fleet.

 

Giving a couple of dialogue quotes from the episode,

Bob points to an old grammar school joke he employed

in the script, and admits to simply “having some fun” among

all the behind-the-scenes drama on the Paramount Studios lot.

 

Suzanne then points out the remarkable connection between

I Love Lucy and the original Star Trek, following that up with

the announcement of Bob’s recent award from the Writers Guild

for having been named for “outstanding television writing”

on the show...and a moment later teases Bob with “where’s the money?”

Direct download: Podcast_17Final.mp3
Category:Television -- posted at: 7:05pm PST

Suzanne starts the episode with a “local’s view” of Oprah Winfrey’s recent

“yard sale” at The Santa Barbara Polo Club just down the road from the

podcast recording studio. 

 

After Bob dodges her questions about “what’s happening with your face?”,

he describes returning to the studio where he was once a “gopher”,

as a writer-producer of Paramount Television’s huge syndicated hit

Star Trek: The Next Generation.

 

With never-before revealed details of his Rolls-Royce ride and

3-martini lunch with Gene Roddenberry, Bob recalls

the rapid turnover of writers, producers, and  executives on ST:TNG,

which became a hugely successful syndicated series hit in spite of

the downward spiral of internal staff and studio politics.

 

Bob pulls no punches in describing his meetings with members

of the show’s cast, to the point where Suzanne says “What a mess!”

Caught in the middle of what he describes as “Shakespearean complexity”

on the show, Bob reveals the secret of surviving on the staff of

any hit television series.

 

He then describes his process for writing credible

science fiction in pursuit of the Star Trek vision, and provides 

the behind-the-scenes motivation for his script

The Icarus Factor...in which he actually tried to kill off

the captain of The Enterprise!

Direct download: Podcast_16FINAL.mp3
Category:Television -- posted at: 8:52pm PST

Suzanne begins by creating some mystery and reveals secrets as she talks about her new bathing suit,

today’s generation of pampered Hollywood pets, why The Wizard of Oz’s “Toto” was

envied by the “munchkins”, and then refers to the new book she and Bob

are working on...but won’t reveal the title!

 

The conversation turns to Bob’s experiences as Supervising Producer on Ohara,

a Warner Bros. TV series that starred Pat Morita of The Karate Kid fame.

Bob reveals the difficulties in writing and producing a cop show for the former “Mr. Miyagi”

with a vague, constantly-changing franchise...a challenge made all the more difficult

by a phalanx of bickering producers, studio chiefs, and network executives

ranging from future Oscar-winner Brian Grazer to a Keith Richards look-and-act-alike.

 

Even with all the behind-the-scenes drama, Bob remembers the fun of writing

great cop action scripts alongside L.A.P.D. Homicide Detective (and future Assistant L.A. Mayor)

Joe Gunn, while casting future superstars like Brandon Lee, Benicio del Toro,

and Cuba Gooding, Jr. in routine “day player” roles.

 

Those casting stories lead Bob to recall his friendship with Bruce Lee long before

Enter The Dragon turned him into an international action superstar.   Bob even details his

eyewitness account of Bruce Lee’s on-the-set humility and a display physical power

that provides plenty of contrast to his experience on Ohara

 

It may have been a case of “too many chefs in the kitchen” on Ohara, but

Bob admits that working on the Warner Bros. studio lot—and bumping into people like

Clint Eastwood—made producing the show a true Hollywood Experience.

Direct download: Podcast_15Final.mp3
Category:Television -- posted at: 11:45pm PST

Suzanne opens discussing Ryan Seacrest’s new reality show “Montecito” and then 

analyzes some hits before reviewing “The Seven Worst Reality Shows” to

ever make it on the air...while Bob shares his passion for

vinyl Rock ‘n Roll record albums.

The conversation moves on to how Bob took advantage of his “inside track”

deal with NBC Productions and his relationship with programming exec

Brandon Tartikoff to pitch and sell a pilot for  Time Out for Dad, which starred

NFL Hall of Famer Dick Butkus and Harriet Nelson.

Bob tells what it was like meeting Chicago Bears linebacker Dick Butkus

for the first time, and then how Butkus held his own as a comedic actor

surrounded by first timers on a movie set. 

Bob recalls his meeting withHarriet Nelson who appeared

in the show...while Suzanne lets it be known that she’s had a lifelong “thing”

for Harriet’s son, famed rocker Ricky Nelson.  We also hear about the

casting process that discovered future TV star Johnny Galecki,

star of the CBS-TV series The Big Bang Theory .

Bob and Suzanne touch upon the fact that Time Out for Dad may

have been ahead of its time, dealing with the challenges faced by a

stay-at-home father married to a wife whose career is on the rise.  They

reminisce about working with Scarface star Paul Shenar on the pilot, as well as

with the veteran crew members whom Bob spent time with, pumping them

for their stories of “Old Hollywood”.

Bob admits to being a “born marketer”, describing the story-point prop shoes

that he shamelessly wrote into the show in hopes of breaking into

the world of  Nike’s Air Jordans, and then turns to the cruel odds of

the TV pilot process as a project goes through the various phases of

story-pitch-script-shoot...and then the dreaded decision-making that follows.


The episode closes with the realities of network programming

changes, as Bob gives his own definition of

“failure” in the world of television.

Direct download: Podcast_14.mp3
Category:Television -- posted at: 8:47pm PST

Suzanne begins with the announcement of a new “Music” category at

www.WhereHollywoodHides.com, and—while reminding us she’s sooo much

younger than Bob—lays claim to being a lifelong Beatles fan. 

For his part, Bob admits that he’s just “a rock-and-roll kind of guy”

and would’ve bet the farm that I Want to Hold Your Hand would never

make the charts.  So much for his musical tastes...

 

The episode moves on to what Bob himself describes as his “greatest

career failure” while under contract to Aaron Spelling Productions writing and

producing Dark Mansions for ABC-TV.  It’s a tale of classic Hollywood

casting politics as Bob sets the record straight as to exactly why former

movie queen Loretta Young never got the part in the film that eventually

went to Oscar winner Joan Fontaine.

 

Bob reveals the nature of production and budgets in Spelling’s 1980s-era

Hollywood, as well as the rationale (follow the money!) for the  excessive

proliferation of producer credits seen on Dark Mansions.  With a tip of the hat

to the talents of Linda Purl, Michael York, Melissa Sue Anderson,

Nicollette Sheridan, and director Jerry London, Bob’s confidence in the show

never prepared him for the horrible results of an evening of sneak-preview 

audience testing.  It’s the story of how a “hit movie” with the promise of becoming

a network television series became an instant embarrassment for all...

as well as an immediate career bump for the fool who wrote it (that’d be Bob).

 

Going from “Golden Boy” to “Bob who?”, and proving the truth of

when you’re hot, your hot, and when you’re not...you’re not,

this episode is a good illustration of the pitfalls to be found on

the Hollywood career path for any writer, actor, producer, or director.

Direct download: Podcast_13.mp3
Category:Television -- posted at: 10:40pm PST

Opening this follow-up to the previous episode with an off-the-wall giggling fit,

Bob and Suzanne quickly recover their “professional bearing” and

Suzanne recalls how she broke into the Screen Actors Guild and entered

the world of studio and network auditions.  Listen as Suzanne tells

how the harsh reality of typecasting and constant rejection taught her

just how tough showbiz can be.

From a double-date with Robert DeNiro and "the method" at The Actors Studio,

to a risque bedroom scene with Bill Murray, Suzanne reveals what

"the Hollywood life" was like for a young actress

willing to try anything...once.

From start to finish, there are lessons here for any aspiring actor...

and some bottom line advice for those chasing the dream.

Direct download: Podcast_12.mp3
Category:Show Business -- posted at: 9:09pm PST

From her first days visiting a boyfriend on the set of The Godfather with Francis Ford Coppola and Al Pacino, Suzanne moved quickly from one opportunity to the next and found herself front-and-center at Hollywood’s famed Central Casting Agency.

She soon found herself  in front of the cameras on shows like Quincy, The Six Million Dollar Man, The Incredible Hulk, The Rockford Files, Columbo, Emergency, C.H.I.P.S., and Kojak, to name just a few.

Suzanne also reveals some of the “dark side” of being an attractive female on those sets, as well as her fond memories of working with true professionals like Lee Majors, James Garner and Bill Bixby.

We hear about what was surely her biggest break when Suzanne was working on Fantasy Island as one of several “Lava-Lava Girls”. Suzanne leaves us hanging a bit, promising to tell us next about her always surprising career as an actress…and much more!

Direct download: Podcast_11_.mp3
Category:Celebrities -- posted at: 7:54pm PST

Celebrating their milestone 10th episode, Suzanne bathes in the afterglow of

Ben Affleck’s Argo win as Best Motion Picture at the 2013 Academy Awards,

but chastises the show’s producers not having someone on hand to catch

Jennifer Lawrence when she took a tumble on her way to accept her Oscar.

 Suzanne mentions the birthday of an iconic I Love Lucy star,

and Bob recalls being on the Paramount Studios lot with Lucy where

Desi Arnaz reinvented the way sitcoms are shot. 

We then learn about the gloriously indulged life of a writer-producer working

under contract to Aaron Spelling and Suzanne shares details of Spelling’s

background that eventually led him to become the most powerful TV producer in history.

When Spelling handed Bob Jackie Collins’ Hollywood Wives to read,

it was the beginning of an incredible year that had him hob-nobbing with

major showbiz icons like Rod Steiger, Candace Bergin, Robert Stack, Suzanne Somers,

Angie Dickenson, Joanna Cassidy, Stephanie Powers, and the man who

would later become “Hannibal Lecter”, Anthony Hopkins.

Suzanne finally gets Bob to admit that he was a bit of an early

sleaze-meister while astutely drawing the parallel between Hollywood Wives

and today’s Kardashians, proving her theory that little has changed when it comes to

attracting an audience because “it’s all entertainment.”

 

Direct download: Podcast_10.mp3
Category:Entertainment -- posted at: 6:04pm PST

Bob & Suzanne share their history on "Falcon Crest" with

fond memories of location shooting in The Napa Valley.

Suzanne reveals details of her friendship with Jane Wyman while

Bob sings the praises of the show's amazing cast including

Susan Sullivan, Bob Foxworth, David Selby, William R. Moses,

Lorenzo Lamas, and a certain Playmate of the Year.

Working with film legend guest stars always brought

surprises...from huge cue cards to a fear of kissing!

The episode wraps up with Bob describing how his work on the

show came to an unexpected end, making a not-so-casual reference

to the head of the studio as...well...a "prick".

Owwww....

Direct download: Podcast_9.mp3
Category:Entertainment -- posted at: 8:22pm PST

Bob & Suzanne open with the contrast between Barbara Walters'

recent bout with chicken pox and Matt Damon's debut as a standup

comic on "Jimmy Kimmel Live"...which leads to Bob admitting he's too

short for Nicole Kidman while Suzanne slips in yet another fawning comment

about Ben Affleck!

We learn how Bob went from writing "BJ & The Bear" to helping create one of

the most enduring nighttime soaps of all time, "Falcon Crest"...and that

Suzanne just missed becoming a housekeeper having sex with J.R. Ewing

on "Dallas" (with a nod to Governor Schwarzenneger).

And before it's over, Bob's equestrian skills become a source of humor for

his long-legged tall-in-the-saddle co-host.

Direct download: Podcast_8.mp3
Category:Television -- posted at: 4:45pm PST